Sunday, July 30, 2017

“How did they divide us and how did they divide our country?”

(Edit: Photo has been updated)

"How did they divide us and how did they divide our country?"

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Tel: 99 966518

Today I would like to share with you an article by an investigative author, Ulus Irkad who writes about the Paphos area…
His article was published in the weekly YENICAG newspaper and reprinted on my pages in the YENIDUZEN newspaper…
Here is a what Ulus Irkad is saying in his article entitled "How did they divide us and how did they divide our country…":
"Since I was born in 1957, I do not have a recollection of how the previous years were but at the beginning of the 1960s, I started becoming aware that some strange things were going on.
For instance, in 1962 I remember listening to my grandfather, sitting on the balcony of our house in Paphos talking about the killing of the lawyers – he had come from England and was living in Paphos… The year was 1962 but there must have been terror attacks by the underground organisation despite the fact that the Republic of Cyprus had been declared two years ago.
Then one morning as we woke up, I remember my mother speaking with the mother of Arif Albayrak that they should not send us kids to school because of the troubles in Nicosia. That day was a holiday for us… It was a holiday but after a few days, we would wake up to the sound of bombs and shooting guns… From the early morning, the bullets had started hitting the walls of our house… In order to make sure that we did not get out my mother was reading us stories from an enormous collection of books in our house. Our father was outside. I knew that sometimes he would go for duty. Then one night we would see our neighbours from the Moutallos area leaving their houses and going to safer places. More troubles would come up and small villages around Paphos would emigrate to the Turkish Cypriot area of Paphos… It was the times of rations… The civil servants and teachers could not be paid… They were without money… Since my father too was a teacher and was not paid and had no money, we could not pay the rent… He would hire a house on the border in a dangerous area… But there, one of our neighbours, Mr. Fuat who had been one of the commanders of the police while saying goodbye to his son Semih sending him to Ayyanni village would be shot dead there… It was said that a Greek Cypriot policeman had shot Mr. Fuat, the police commander. We were so full of fear that we left that house as well and went to a two room house that did not even have a toilet inside… We would distribute the enormous library and all the books of my father to relatives. This mess would continue until 1967. Still I can make no sense of these events – our population as Turkish Cypriots in the Paphos area was fifteen thousand and I still cannot understand why our commanders were making provocations against the Greek Cypriots in the area whose population was four times more than us! If the Greek Cypriot population of Paphos would spit, they would drown us but despite this why was there an attack particularly on the 7th of March 1964 at the Greek Cypriot market area taking hundreds of Greek Cypriots as prisoners and why did our people kill seven innocent Greek Cypriots that day? Wasn't this officially inviting a population four times as much as our small community to gather in a few hours and with their power of guns and numbers, could destroy us? Why were such illogical and suicidal retaliations were done by our side? Or was it because of the 4th of March decision which had stopped the intervention of Turkey – to make provocations in order to try to start an intervention by Turkey? Such things crossed our minds… There are also allegations that provocations were done prior to the 7th of March 1964 events opening the way for a Greek Cypriot called M. to kill a Turkish Cypriot… When M. did that, our side would attack the market place as a retaliation but as a result of the seven Greek Cypriots killed, we would lose 15 Turkish Cypriots. Retaliation per retaliation would result bombs and tanks firing at Turkish Cypriots and in the end accepting the conditions of surrender.
According to what we heard, Dr. Ihsan Ali – one of the leaders of the Paphos area – would call Glafcos Klerides and managed to stop the retaliation of Greek Cypriots. Two years ago a documentary called "In the name of Motherland" was produced and in this documentary some EOKA leaders would say that after the Mavrali events where 9 Turkish Cypriots had been killed, they had planned to continue these killings for the whole of the Paphos area…
After the 1964 troubles one day our mother took us to the fields… Apparently the command of the Turkish Cypriot soldiers in Paphos had noticed our presence in the fields through binoculars and had thought that we had been "spying"… On our way back, we would be stopped by Turkish Cypriot soldiers and were told that we needed to be searched. My mother was very angry at that and very heart broken… She was pregnant and she would go to the command and question the commander about why we were being treated like "traitors". They would tell her that this was the decision of the command and that we were under investigation. Later on some youngsters who went swimming would be ambushed and would be beaten up with sticks by the Turkish Cypriot underground organisation. While struggling against some Greek Cypriot fanatics, our community was under pressure internally by this underground organisation. At that time, many rude actions were done against the family of Dr. Ihsan Ali. In the centre of Moutallo, his family would be beaten up in front of everyone and even women were not spared from this beating. When those supporting Dr. Ihsan Ali came under pressure, some families who supported him would have to leave for the Greek Cypriot area and live there. One of those families had a son – one of his arms was crippled and some men from the underground organisation would come to the lyceum he attended and would beat him so severely that they would break his arm… My father who was his teacher stopped this – if he hadn't, perhaps they would beat him up even more… What was strange was that this boy's elder brother was in Kokkino fighting there… While his family in Paphos was beaten up as "traitor", their elder son, not aware of this was fighting in Kokkino…
Then in 1966-67 there would be a raid at the house of two old ladies supposedly "suspected of being spies" where they would be killed – their heads were cut off… Actually the Paphos Turkish Cypriot community understood quite well how these women had been killed but maybe the underground organisation wanted to give a message to the community as a warning that "this might happen to you as well…" And of course, getting these messages, the community would be even more surrendering and would go even more quiet… This is how the quiet community was created at the end of 1967…
While members of the Turkish Cypriot community faced such pressure internally, when they travelled between districts, would also face pressure in the Greek Cypriot areas… There were barricades… Tens of Turkish Cypriot workers would be taken as prisoners in such barricades and would disappear… I remember coming across such barricades both at the exit of Paphos and other places while going to Nicosia after 1964 together with my aunt and her family and would be searched by Greek Cypriots. Even though I was only 7-8 years old, I too was searched each time together with Turkish Cypriot males. They would even have me take off my shoes and search me thoroughly… Such body searches by Greek Cypriots at different barricades would continue at Chaghlayan barricade (around Famagusta gate) while entering Nicosia until 1968… Internally the underground organisation and outside the enclaves, EOKA teams were the same… There was a chauffeur called Ali who had got married with a Greek Cypriot girl and he was coming to see his mother in the Paphos Turkish Cypriot enclave – he would be arrested by some EOKA members and would be tortured… I will never forget his Turkish Cypriot mother who only spoke Greek – until she died she would always cry, saying "Manamu Buisegiemu, manamu Buisegiemu…" (meaning "my poor son… my poor son…")
There were also cases when in Paphos and on the roads some Turkish Cypriots were held in 1967. The underground organisation of the Turkish Cypriots would try to solve such cases by retaliation… For instance in the village Koloni a fanatic Greek Cypriot called A. from Steni would fire at some Turkish Cypriots and would wound two Turkish Cypriots and kill a Turkish Cypriot youth. Later on some Turkish Cypriots from the underground organisation from Suskiou would go on the Kelokedara-Paphos road and would kill the taxi driver Irakleous, a pregnant woman Antigone and his soldier son… When this killing was heard, the next day, EOKA members would collect Turkish Cypriots that they found in the market in Ktima and would kill them – some Turkish Cypriots are still "missing" from that day… (Among those "missing" are the mukhtar of Agios Georgios, Shukru Redif and his 16 year old son Shefik Shukru who had gone to a travel agency for a ticket and to the Paphos police station that day for some formalities for the passport of Shefik… According to some information we gathered they would be taken to Polemi and killed there and buried in a well in Polemi… I would appreciate if my readers can call me anonymously if they like, if they know of their burial site – S.U.)
Questions linger about why the Paphos Central Turkish Cypriot Military Command, despite knowing that there would be retaliation by Greek Cypriots, they did not prevent Turkish Cypriots going to the market in Ktima that day… Who knows, maybe they were thinking that "let them be killed so we can be shown to be right"?
In 1974, both communities would retaliate and would kill each other… Hundreds of people killed and some are still "missing"… Both during the war and after both Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots taken as prisoners of war were also killed.
So this is the point where we have reached – this is how we were divided, this is how they divided us and both sides are guilty because of all that has happened. These enmities are the given opportunities to imperialism to scratch at ethnic differences and to use these in order to divide us… Whatever happened leaders, particularly a leader like Makarios who posed as a charismatic leader should have seen that such actions would lead to the partition of the island and should have given peaceful messages. He should not have used nationalistic and antagonistic speech, dividing the two communities. He should have done this during the troubles of 1963… One of the Turkish Cypriot leaders was more than ready for negative answers…
I believe that both sides should admit their mistakes and talk about these. I also remember the speeches about ENOSIS during 1972-73 at public meetings by Makarios in Paphos… He would not listen to the proposals of Dr. Ihsan Ali and would follow his own mind. Discriminatory policies and lack of empathy towards Turkish Cypriots took us all the way to the 15th of July and 20th of July 1974. Such arrogant speeches and actions served the partitionist Turkish Cypriot leadership and brought us the partition. Yes there was an occupation but there was also the 1963-64 troubles and the racism and nationalism of the Greek Cypriot ruling elites that triggered the occupation. In 1963, they had taken over the Republic of Cyprus, showing off their superiority… Such mistakes took us to 1974 and to the partition. I wish that the only mistakes were made by the Turkish Cypriot side but that's not the case – Greek Cypriots side too made these mistakes. We must discuss these things knowing that since 1963 there is an abnormal status quo and that 1974 brought in more complications and we must find an egalitarian solution… This could be a democratic republic…. Both Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots must discuss this…"
(ULUS IRKAD – 4.6.2017)

Photo: Father Shukru Redif and 16 year old son Shefik still "missing" from Paphos…

(*) Article published in the POLITIS newspaper on the 30th of July 2017, Sunday.
The article was published in Turkish in Yenichagh newspaper and also on my pages in the Yenidüzen newspaper on the 8th of June 2017… The link to the article:
http://www.yeniduzen.com/nasil-bolunduk-ve-nasil-bolduler-10790yy.htm

«Πως μας χώρισαν και πως διαίρεσαν τη χώρα μας;»


(Edit: The photo has been updated.) 

«Πως μας χώρισαν και πως διαίρεσαν τη χώρα μας;»

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Τηλ: 99 966518

Σήμερα θα ήθελα να μοιραστώ μαζί σας ένα άρθρο του ερευνητικού συγγραφέα Ulus Irkad που γράφει για την περιοχή της Πάφου…
Το άρθρο του δημοσιεύθηκε στην εβδομαδιαία εφημερίδα YENICAG και αναδημοσιεύθηκε στις σελίδες μου στην εφημερίδα YENIDUZEN…
Ο Ulus Irkad λέει τα ακόλουθα στο άρθρο του με τίτλο «Πως μας χώρισαν και πως διαίρεσαν τη χώρα μας;…»:
«Εφόσον γεννήθηκα το 1957, δεν έχω ανάμνηση πως ήταν τα προηγούμενα χρόνια, αλλά στην αρχή της δεκαετίας του 1960, ξεκίνησα να αντιλαμβάνομαι ότι συμβαίνανε κάποια παράξενα πράγματα.
Για παράδειγμα, το 1962 θυμούμαι τον παππού μου να μιλά, ενώ καθόμασταν στο μπαλκόνι του σπιτιού μας στην Πάφο, για τη δολοφονία των δικηγόρων – είχε έρθει από την Αγγλία και ζούσε στην Πάφο… Η χρονιά ήταν 1962 αλλά πρέπει να υπήρχαν τρομοκρατικές επιθέσεις από την υπόγεια οργάνωση παρόλο που η Κυπριακή Δημοκρατία είχε ανακηρυχθεί δύο χρόνια πριν.
Τότε μια μέρα όταν ξύπνησα, θυμούμαι τη μητέρα μου να μιλά με τη μητέρα του Arif Albayrak και να λένε ότι δεν θα έπρεπε να μας στείλουν, εμάς τα παιδιά, στο σχολείο λόγω των ταραχών στη Λευκωσία. Εκείνη η μέρα ήταν αργία για μας… Ήταν αργία αλλά μετά από μερικές μέρες ξυπνήσαμε στον ήχο βομβών και πυροβολισμών… Από νωρίς το πρωί οι σφαίρες άρχισαν να κτυπούν τους τοίχους του σπιτιού μας… Η μητέρα μου μας διάβαζε ιστορίες από μια τεράστια συλλογή βιβλίων που υπήρχε στο σπίτι μας για να σιγουρευτεί ότι δεν θα βγαίναμε έξω. Ο πατέρας μας ήταν έξω. Ήξερα ότι κάποιες φορές πήγαινε για καθήκον. Τότε ένα βράδυ είδαμε τους γείτονες μας από την περιοχή του Μούτταλου να φεύγουν από τα σπίτια τους και να πηγαίνουν σε πιο ασφαλή μέρη. Έρχονταν περισσότερες φασαρίες και τα μικρά χωριά γύρω στην Πάφο μετακόμιζαν στην τουρκοκυπριακή περιοχή της Πάφου… Ήταν η εποχή των συσσιτίων… Οι δημόσιοι υπάλληλοι και οι δάσκαλοι δεν πληρώνονταν… Δεν είχαν λεφτά… Εφόσον και ο πατέρας μου ήταν επίσης δάσκαλος και δεν πληρωνόταν και δεν είχε λεφτά, δεν μπορούσαμε να πληρώσουμε το ενοίκιο… Ενοικίασε ένα σπίτι στο σύνορο με μια επικίνδυνη περιοχή…. Αλλά εκεί, ένας από τους γείτονες μας, ο κύριος Fuat που ήταν ένας από τους διοικητές της αστυνομίας στην περιοχή Πάφου ενώ αποχαιρετούσε το γιο του Semih και τον έστελνε στο χωριό Άγιος Ιωάννης, πυροβολήθηκε εκεί… Λέγεται ότι ήταν ένας Ελληνοκύπριος αστυνομικός που είχε πυροβολήσει τον κύριο Fuat, τον διοικητή της αστυνομίας. Ήμασταν τόσο φοβισμένοι που φύγαμε και από εκείνο σπίτι και πήγαμε σε ένα σπίτι με δύο δωμάτια που δεν είχε μέσα ούτε τουαλέτα… Διαμοιράσαμε σε συγγενείς την τεράστια βιβλιοθήκη και όλα τα βιβλία του πατέρα μου. Το χάος συνεχίστηκε μέχρι το 1967. Ακόμα δεν μπορώ να καταλάβω τα γεγονότα αυτά – ο πληθυσμός μας ως Τουρκοκύπριοι στην περιοχή Πάφου ήταν δεκαπέντε χιλιάδες και ακόμα δεν μπορώ να καταλάβω γιατί οι στρατιωτικοί διοικητές μας έκαναν προβοκάτσια έναντι στους Ελληνοκύπριους στην περιοχή, των οποίων ο πληθυσμός ήταν τετραπλάσιος από εμάς! Αν ο Ελληνοκυπριακός πληθυσμός της Πάφου απλά έφτυνε, θα μας έπνιγαν αλλά παρόλ' αυτά, γιατί υπήρξε επίθεση ιδιαίτερα στις 7 Μαρτίου 1964 στην περιοχή της ελληνοκυπριακής αγοράς παίρνοντας εκατοντάδες Ελληνοκύπριους αιχμάλωτους και γιατί οι άνθρωποι μας σκότωσαν επτά αθώους Ελληνοκύπριους εκείνη τη μέρα; Δεν ήταν αυτό επίσημη πρόσκληση σε ένα πληθυσμό τέσσερεις φορές μεγαλύτερο από τη μικρή μας κοινότητα να μαζευτούν σε μερικές ώρες και με τη δύναμη τους, με όπλα και αριθμούς, να μας καταστρέψουν; Γιατί υπήρχαν τέτοια παράλογα και αυτοκτονικά αντίποινα από την πλευρά μας; Ή ήταν επειδή η απόφαση της 4ης Μαρτίου που είχε σταματήσει την παρέμβαση της Τουρκίας, να γίνονται προβοκάτσια, για να προσπαθήσει να ξεκινήσει μια παρέμβαση από την Τουρκία; Τέτοια πράγματα πέρασαν από το μυαλό μας… Υπήρχαν επίσης ισχυρισμοί ότι τα προβοκάτσια έγινα πριν από τα γεγονότα της 7ης Μαρτίου 1964, ανοίγοντας το δρόμο για έναν Ελληνοκύπριο, τον Μ., να σκοτώσει ένα Τουρκοκύπριο… Όταν ο Μ. το έκανε αυτό, η πλευρά μας επιτέθηκε ως αντίποινα στην αγορά αλλά ως αποτέλεσμα των επτά Ελληνοκυπρίων που σκοτώθηκαν, χάσαμε 15 Τουρκοκύπριους. Αντίποινα σε αντίποινα είχαν ως αποτέλεσμα βόμβες και τανκς να πυροβολούν Τουρκοκύπριους και στο τέλος την αποδοχή των όρων της παράδοσης…
Σύμφωνα με αυτά που ακούσαμε, ο Dr. Ihsan Ali – ένας από τους ηγέτες της περιοχής της Πάφου – τηλεφώνησε στο Γλαύκο Κληρίδη και κατάφερε να σταματήσει τα αντίποινα των Ελληνοκυπρίων. Πριν από δύο χρόνια, έγινε ένα ντοκιμαντέρ με τίτλο «Στο όνομα της μητέρας πατρίδας» και στο ντοκιμαντέρ αυτό κάποιοι ηγέτες της ΕΟΚΑ είπαν ότι μετά τα γεγονότα στο Μαυραλί όπου 9 Τουρκοκύπριοι είχαν σκοτωθεί, είχαν προγραμματίσει να συνεχίσουν τους σκοτωμούς αυτούς σε όλη την περιοχή της Πάφου…
Μετά τις φασαρίες του 1964, μια μέρα η μητέρα μας μας πήρε στα χωράφια… Προφανώς ο διοικητής των Τουρκοκύπριων στρατιωτών στην Πάφο είχε προσέξει με τα κιάλια την παρουσία μας στα χωράφια και νόμισε ότι «κατασκοπεύαμε»… Στην επιστροφή μας σταμάτησαν Τουρκοκύπριοι στρατιώτες και μας είπαν ότι έπρεπε να μας ερευνήσουν. Η μητέρα μου θύμωσε πολύ και πληγώθηκε πολύ… Ήταν έγκυος και πήγε στο στρατιωτικό διοικητή και τον ρώτησε γιατί μας συμπεριφέρονταν σαν «προδότες». Της είπαν ότι αυτή ήταν απόφαση της διοίκησης και ότι ήμασταν υπό διερεύνηση. Αργότερα κάποιοι νεαροί που πήγαν για κολύμπι έπεσαν σε ενέδρα που τους έστησε η τουρκοκυπριακή υπόγεια οργάνωση και τους έδειραν με ραβδιά. Ενώ αγωνίζονταν ενάντια σε κάποιους Ελληνοκύπριους φανατικούς, η κοινότητα μας ήταν υπό εσωτερική πίεση από αυτή την υπόγεια οργάνωση. Εκείνο τον καιρό, έγιναν πολλές αγενείς πράξεις ενάντια στην οικογένεια του Dr. Ihsan Ali. Στο κέντρο του Μούτταλου, η οικογένεια του κτυπήθηκε μπροστά σε όλους – ακόμα και οι γυναίκες κτυπήθηκαν. Όταν πιέστηκαν εκείνοι που υποστήριζαν τον Dr. Ihsan Ali, κάποιες οικογένειες που τον υποστήριζαν αναγκάστηκαν να φύγουν για την Ελληνοκυπριακή περιοχή και να ζήσουν εκεί. Μια από αυτές τις οικογένειες είχε ένα γιο – το ένα από τα χέρια του ήταν ακρωτηριασμένο και κάποιοι άντρες από την υπόγεια οργάνωση ήρθαν στο λύκειο που φοιτούσε και τον έδειραν τόσο πολύ που του έσπασαν το χέρι… Ο πατέρας μου που ήταν ο δάσκαλος του το σταμάτησε αυτό – αν δεν το έκανε ίσως να τον έδερναν ακόμα περισσότερο… Ενώ η οικογένεια του στην Πάφο δέρνονταν σαν «προδότες», ο μεγάλος τους γιος, πολεμούσε στα Κόκκινα χωρίς να το γνώριζε αυτό…
Τότε το 1966-67 έγινε επιδρομή στο σπίτι δύο ηλικιωμένων κυριών που υποτίθεται ήταν «ύποπτες κατάσκοποι» όπου σκοτώθηκαν – έκοψαν τα κεφάλια τους… Κατ' ακρίβεια η Τουρκοκυπριακή κοινότητα της Πάφου κατάλαβε αρκετά καλά πως οι γυναίκες αυτές είχαν σκοτωθεί, αλλά ίσως η υπόγεια οργάνωση ήθελε να δώσει το μήνυμα στην κοινότητα ως προειδοποίηση ότι «αυτό μπορεί να γίνει και σε σας…» Και φυσικά, λαμβάνοντας αυτά τα μηνύματα, η κοινότητα θα ήταν ακόμα πιο παραδομένη και θα γινόταν ακόμα πιο σιωπηλή… Έτσι είναι που δημιουργήθηκε η ήσυχη κοινότητα στο τέλος του 1967…
Ενώ τα μέλη της Τουρκοκυπριακής κοινότητας αντιμετώπιζαν τέτοια πίεση εσωτερικά, όταν ταξίδευαν μεταξύ επαρχιών, αντιμετώπιζαν πίεση και στις Ελληνοκυπριακές περιοχές… Υπήρχαν οδοφράγματα… Δεκάδες Τουρκοκύπριοι εργάτες αιχμαλωτίζονταν σε τέτοια οδοφράγματα και εξαφανίζονταν… Θυμούμαι να αντιμετωπίζω τέτοια οδοφράγματα και στην έξοδο της Πάφου και σε άλλα μέρη ενώ πήγαινα στη Λευκωσία μετά το 1964 μαζί με τη θεία μου και την οικογένεια της και μας ερευνούσαν οι Ελληνοκύπριοι. Παρά το γεγονός ότι ήμουν μόνο 7-8 χρονών, ερευνούσαν και εμένα κάθε φορά μαζί με τους Τουρκοκύπριους άντρες. Με ανάγκαζαν να βγάλω και τα παπούτσια μου και με ερευνούσαν λεπτομερώς… Τέτοιες σωματικές έρευνες από Ελληνοκύπριους σε διαφορετικά οδοφράγματα συνεχίζονταν μέχρι το 1968στο οδόφραγμα του Chaghlayan (κοντά στην Πύλη Αμμοχώστου) ενώ μπαίναμε στη Λευκωσία… Εσωτερικά η υπόγεια οργάνωση και εκτός των θυλάκων, οι ομάδες της ΕΟΚΑ ήταν το ίδιο… Υπήρχε ένας οδηγός που ονομαζόταν Ali που είχε παντρευτεί με μια Ελληνοκύπρια κοπέλα και ερχόταν να δει τη μητέρα του στον Τουρκοκυπριακό θύλακα στην Πάφο – συνελήφθηκε από κάποια μέλη της ΕΟΚΑ και βασανίστηκε… Ποτέ δεν θα ξεχάσω την Τουρκοκύπρια μητέρα του που μιλούσε μόνο ελληνικά – μέχρι που πέθανε πάντοτε έκλαιγε λέγοντας «Μάνα μου που είσαι γιε μου, μάνα μου που είσαι γιε μου…»
Υπήρχαν επίσης περιπτώσεις το 1967 όταν κρατήθηκαν κάποιοι Τουρκοκύπριοι στην Πάφο και στους δρόμους. Η υπόγεια οργάνωση των Τουρκοκυπρίων προσπαθούσε να λύσει τέτοιες περιπτώσεις με αντίποινα… Για παράδειγμα στο χωριό Κολώνη, ένας φανατικός Ελληνοκύπριος, o A. από τη Στενή πυροβόλησε κάποιους Τουρκοκύπριους και πλήγωσε δύο Τουρκοκύπριους και σκότωσε ένα νέο Τουρκοκύπριο. Αργότερα κάποιοι Τουρκοκύπριοι από την υπόγεια οργάνωση από τη Σουσκιού πήγαν στο δρόμο Κελοκεδάρων-Πάφου και σκότωσαν τον ταξιτζή Ηρακλεόυς, μια έγκυο γυναίκα την Αντιγόνη και τον στρατιώτη γιο του… Όταν μαθεύτηκαν οι σκοτωμοί αυτοί την επόμενη μέρα, μέλη της ΕΟΚΑ μάζεψαν τους Τουρκοκύπριους που βρήκαν στην αγορά στο Κτήμα και τους σκότωσαν – κάποιοι Τουρκοκύπριοι είναι ακόμα «αγνοούμενοι» από εκείνη τη μέρα… (Ανάμεσα σε εκείνους τους «αγνοούμενους» είναι ο μουχτάρης τους Αγίου Γεωργίου Shukru Redif και ο 16χρονος γιος του Shefik Shukru που είχε πάει εκείνη τη μέρα για ένα εισιτήριο σε ταξιδιωτικό γραφείο και στον Αστυνομικό Σταθμό Πάφου για κάποιες διατυπώσεις για το διαβατήριο του Shefik… Σύμφωνα με κάποιες πληροφορίες που μαζέψαμε, τους πήραν στο Πολέμι και τους σκότωσαν εκεί και τους έθαψαν σε ένα πηγάδι στο Πολέμι… Θα το εκτιμούσα αν οι αναγνώστες μου μπορούν να μου τηλεφωνήσουν ανώνυμα αν θέλουν, αν γνωρίζουν τον τόπο ταφής τους – S.U.)
Κρέμονται ακόμα τα ερωτήματα γιατί η Κεντρική Τουρκοκυπριακή Στρατιωτική Διοίκηση Πάφου παρόλο που γνώριζαν ότι θα υπήρχαν αντίποινα από τους Ελληνοκύπριους, δεν απέτρεψαν τους Τουρκοκύπριους από το να πάνε εκείνη τη μέρα στην αγορά στο Κτήμα… Ποιος ξέρει, μπορεί να σκέφτηκαν ότι «άστε τους να σκοτωθούν έτσι ώστε να αποδειχθούμε ότι έχουμε δίκαιο»;
Το 1974 και οι δύο κοινότητες έκαναν αντίποινα και σκότωναν ο ένας τον άλλο… Εκατοντάδες άνθρωποι σκοτώθηκαν και κάποιοι είναι ακόμα «αγνοούμενοι»… Τόσο στη διάρκεια του πολέμου όσο και μετά, σκοτώθηκαν και Τουρκοκύπριοι και Ελληνοκύπριοι που τους έπιασαν ως αιχμάλωτους πολέμου.
Έτσι έχουμε φτάσει σε αυτό το σημείο– έτσι είναι πως χωριστήκαμε, έτσι είναι που μας χώρισαν και οι δύο πλευρές είναι ένοχες για όλα που έχουν συμβεί. Αυτές οι εχθρότητες είναι οι ευκαιρίες που δίνονται στον ιμπεριαλισμό για να ξύσουν τις εθνικές διαφορές και να τις χρησιμοποιήσουν για να μας χωρίσουν… Ότι συνέβηκε, οι ηγέτες, ιδιαίτερα ένας ηγέτης όπως ο Μακάριος που φερόταν ως χαρισματικός ηγέτης, έπρεπε να δει ότι τέτοιες δράσεις θα οδηγούσαν στη διαίρεση του νησιού και έπρεπε να έδινε ειρηνικά μηνύματα… Δεν θα έπρεπε να χρησιμοποιούσε εθνικιστικό και ανταγωνιστικό λόγο, διαιρώντας τις δύο κοινότητες. Έπρεπε να το πράξει αυτό στη διάρκεια των ταραχών του 1963… Ένας από τους Τουρκοκύπριους ηγέτες ήταν περισσότερο από έτοιμος για αρνητικές απαντήσεις…
Πιστεύω ότι και οι δύο πλευρές πρέπει να παραδεχθούν τα λάθη τους και να μιλήσουν για αυτά. Επίσης θυμούμαι τις ομιλίες για την ΕΝΩΣΗ στις δημόσιες εμφανίσεις του Μακάριου στην Πάφο το 1972-73… Δεν άκουγε τις προτάσεις του Dr. Ihsan Ali και ακολουθούσε το δικό του μυαλό. Οι πολιτικές διακρίσεων και η έλλειψη ενσυναίσθησης προς τους Τουρκοκύπριους μας οδήγησε στις 15 και 20 Ιουλίου 1974. Τέτοιες αλαζονικές ομιλίες και δράσεις εξυπηρέτησαν την διαιρετική Τουρκοκυπριακή ηγεσία και μας έφεραν τη διαίρεση. Ναι, υπήρξε κατοχή αλλά υπήρξαν και οι φασαρίες του 1963-64 και ο ρατσισμός και εθνικισμός της Ελληνοκυπριακής κυβερνούσας ελίτ που έδωσαν έναυσμα στην κατοχή. Το 1963 είχαν καταλάβει την Κυπριακή Δημοκρατία, δείχνοντας την υπεροχή τους… Τέτοια λάθη μας οδήγησαν στο 1974 και τη διαίρεση. Μακάρι τα μόνα λάθη να είχαν γίνει μόνο από την τουρκοκυπριακή πλευρά, αλλά αυτό δεν ισχύει – και η ελληνοκυπριακή πλευρά έκανε επίσης αυτά τα λάθη. Πρέπει να συζητήσουμε αυτά τα πράγματα γνωρίζοντας ότι από το 1963 υπάρχει ένα αντικανονικό στάτους κβο και ότι το 1974 έφερε ακόμα περισσότερες επιπλοκές και πρέπει να βρούμε μια ισόρροπη λύση… Αυτή θα μπορούσε να είναι μια δημοκρατική δημοκρατία… Τόσο οι Ελληνοκύπριοι όσο και οι Τουρκοκύπριοι πρέπει να το συζητήσουν αυτό…»
(ULUS IRKAD – 4.6.2017)

Photo: Father Shukru Redif and 16 year old son Shefik still "missing" from Paphos…

(*) Article published in the POLITIS newspaper on the 30th of July 2017, Sunday.
The article was published in Turkish in Yenichagh newspaper and also on my pages in the Yenidüzen newspaper on the 8th of June 2017… The link to the article:
http://www.yeniduzen.com/nasil-bolunduk-ve-nasil-bolduler-10790yy.htm

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Tales of Cyprus from another time: When we had not been divided… (Part B)

Tales of Cyprus from another time: When we had not been divided… (Part B)

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Tel: 99 966518

Constantinos Emmanuelle who created `Tales of Cyprus` on the internet has compiled stories from our good friends Huseyin Halil and Christalla Avgousti who have been going around the island, compiling stories from our past on RIK2 in their wonderful programme called `Under the Same Sky`… Constantinos Emmanuel says:
`The following transcripts are taken from video interviews conducted by my friend Huseyin Halil for RIK2. Huseyin and his film crew travelled around the island interviewing elderly Greek and Turkish Cypriots to find out how the two communities co-existed before 1950. I am grateful to have been allowed permission to translate some of these interviews into English for Tales of Cyprus.
Needless to say, I am not surprised to hear the heartfelt confessions of these elderly Cypriots who recall a time of bliss and unity. The one common and resounding 'truth' revealed by each person was that there was once a time in Cyprus when Muslims and Christians co-existed without malice, prejudice or discrimination. "We were like brothers," is a reoccurring statement.
Anyway, enough from me – I'll let you read these living memories for yourself.
(Please note: The word Turk or Turkish in these transcripts refers to Cypriots who are Muslim).

LOUKAS ANDRONIKOU – DROMOLAXIA VILLAGE, LARNACA.
My football team had some great players. We had Nazim Ali, Huseyin Alaman, Zekai and Mustafa. We played together united as one big happy team. There were no issues. My friend Nazim Ali once played in a Greek theatrical play and he was so committed to his role that he was able to learn his lines and spoke them in perfect Greek. They loved our traditions and we loved theirs. We were the same.
My father used to tell me that in the olden days there was a little kafenion that belonged to the Hala Sultan Tekke and they had coffee, sugar and a coal-based stove that was always alight. The kafenion owners allowed Christians any time to come and use the stove to make their own coffee without any discrimination. There was such open φιλοξενία (hospitality) back then.

NINA ANDRONIKOU – DROMOLAXIA, LARNACA.
I was born in the Turkish Mahala (neighbourhood). I grew up amongst the Turkish Cypriots until I was twenty years old. We got along so well, I mean extremely well. I didn't think to go and play with the Greek Cypriots in the village. All day I was with the Turkish girls: to play, to run. It was a joyous time for me. What can I tell you? We were never apart. I remember them all even today. There was Hatice, there was Neriman, and there was Havva. We were together all day – all day.
I remember going to their weddings. We would all sit together in a large room – all women and the violinist would play his tunes. The violinist had to be blind. He wasn't allowed to see the women. It was a room full of women and the bride would be there all dressed up and looking beautiful. There were women painting the bride with henna. We stayed in that room for three days. Each night the bride would wear a different dress. The first night her dress was rose coloured, the second the dress was blue and the last night her dress was white. The men were separated from the women. They would all be celebrating at the kafenion with their brass instruments and their drums.

PANAYIOTA SOLOMI – KOMI KEBIR VILLAGE, FAMAGUSTA.
From the time we were toddlers we used to pay together with the little Turkish children in the village. My friend was Serife. My father worked with Ibrahim and they were like brothers. We never had a problem. We never - we never had any ill feeling towards our Turkish neighbours.

PANAYIOTIS KKLOS – INIA VILLAGE, PAPHOS.
I finished primary school in my village of Inia in 1945. My mother, who was a widower raising seven children could not afford to send me to the gymnasium (high school) in Ktima. I was destined to become a shepherd. My papou Haralambos however (God bless him) felt pity on me and arranged to send me to a Turkish school in Arodes. So barefoot with my donkey we travelled together to Arodes where we met the schoolteacher Mustapha. The schoolteacher accepted me into his classroom without any hesitation. He sat me at the front of the class next to a boy named Ahmet. At that time, Greek language was not allowed to be taught in Turkish schools but the teacher would still translate the lesson into Greek just for me. Little by little I was able to speak Turkish and in this way completed all my lessons with high marks. My classmates had accepted me from the start and they all loved me as I too loved them.

NICOS CHRISTOU - PENTAKOMO VILLAGE, LIMASSOL.
We lived together very well indeed. We didn't have any problems. If anyone visited the village they couldn't distinguish who was Turkish and who was Greek. I'm telling you - we looked and acted the same. They spoke our language the same as us; exactly the same. There was no difference. We were like brothers.

KOSTAKIS PANAYI - PENTAKOMO VILLAGE, LIMASSOL.
We were always together. At no time did anyone distinguish whether you were Christian or Muslim. We drank together, we celebrated together, we went to each other's weddings; to each other's coffee houses together and we played cards together. We were like brothers.

STELIOS CHRISTOU - PENTAKOMO VILLAGE, LIMASSOL.
I had many Muslim friends. There was Kemal, Turan, Beyzade and Hasancik. With little Hasancik we used to play-wrestle for the amusement of the elders. We would all sit in large holes in the ground, eating together, talking and even sleeping together in the great holes with our flocks of sheep nearby.

KATERINA PATSALOU - PERISTERONA VILLAGE, PAPHOS.
We were no different. Whenever the Turkish women had milk they would bring me fresh anari (ricotta style cheese). When they had watermelons, they would always give us some. We got along very well. When my neighbour was baking bread, she would call me to her house to eat with her. We were the same. We shared so much together. At night if I were walking with other girls along a narrow path, the Turkish men would lean against the wall to allow us enough room to walk past them without difficulty. No, no my friend we got along very well. I didn't meet anyone back then who had a problem with the Turks.

KYRIACOS ELETHERIOU - PERISTERONA VILLAGE, PAPHOS.
My father used to build houses for the Turks in the village. At that time, there was no money and he was struggling to buy equipment and materials. A Turkish friend by the name of Mumtaz loaned my father 200 pounds to buy a machine that he needed. With the amazing generosity of the Turk, my father was able to continue to build his houses. Two hundred pounds was a lot of money back then. My father would have had to sell a property or go into debt to get that sort of money. Thanks to Mumtaz however he did not need to do this.

CHRYSTALLA LOUKIA – ASOMATOS VILLAGE, LIMASSOL.
Let me tell you a story. When I was very small my parents became very ill and were sent to hospital. My eldest sister who was ten at the time had to look after the four of us children. It was our good neighbours Abdullah and Hatice who stepped in to help us. They killed a rabbit and helped my sister to prepare a meal to feed us. You can't forget these acts of kindness.

GIANOULLA VRONTI – AMBELIKOS VILLAGE, LIMASSOL.
We got along extremely well with our Turkish neighbours. I remember as a child going to watch the Karaghiozis puppet theatre at the kafenion. We all sat together, Christians and Muslims. You couldn't separate us. There was no other entertainment in those days. It was only later when we would discover the cinema.

AFRODITI ARISTARHOU – KALAVASOS VILLAGE, LARNACA.
We got along 'μια χαρα' (fine) with our Turkish neighbours. There was so much trust between us. My father's friend Halil would place my sister and I on his donkey to accompany him to his fields whenever he was sowing or threshing. Two little girls on a donkey. He brought his bulgur wheat so we could cook for him.

THEKLA SAVVA – KALAVASOS VILLAGE, LARNACA.
My husband once was trapped under a wagon and Turks came to rescue him. They brought him to my house half-dead and every day they would come past to check on him and to see if I needed any help: such good people. Even our own people didn't care as much. We were like brothers and sisters. There was one man Sevket. What an amazing man he was: such kindness towards my family. He would see my children walking to school and he would shout 'Dorothi, Rena, come and let me give you an ice cream.' He would never accept payment. Never. At my own wedding we had a Turkish koumbaro (best man). We danced together. Brothers I tell you. I can't tell you how well we all got along.

www.talesofcyprus.com

(*) Article published in POLITIS newspaper on the 23rd of July 2017, Sunday.

Ιστορίες της Κύπρου από μια άλλη εποχή: Όταν δεν είχαμε διαιρεθεί… (μέρος Β)

Ιστορίες της Κύπρου από μια άλλη εποχή: Όταν δεν είχαμε διαιρεθεί… (μέρος Β)

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Τηλ: 99 966518

Ο Constantinos Emmanuelle, που δημιούργησε το «Tales of Cyprus» (Ιστορίες της Κύπρου) στο διαδίκτυο, έχει συντάξει ιστορίες από τους καλούς μας φίλους Huseyin Halil και Χρυστάλα Αυγουστή που γυρίζουν του νησί και μαζεύουν ιστορίες από το παρελθόν μας για το υπέροχο τους πρόγραμμα το ΡΙΚ2 «Κάτω από τον ίδιο ουρανό»… Ο Constantinos Emmanuelle λέει:
«Τα ακόλουθα προέρχονται από την απομαγνητοσκόπηση των βιντεογραφημένων συνεντεύξεων που διενέργησε ο φίλος μου Huseyin Halil για το ΡΙΚ2. Ο Huseyin και το κινηματογραφικό του συνεργείο ταξίδεψαν σε όλο το νησί και έπαιρναν συνεντεύξεις από ηλικιωμένους Ελληνοκύπριους και Τουρκοκύπριους έτσι ώστε να μάθουν πως οι δύο κοινότητες συνυπήρχαν πριν το 1950. Είμαι ευγνώμων που μου δόθηκε η άδεια να μεταφράσω στα αγγλικά κάποιες από αυτές τις συνεντεύξεις για το Tales of Cyprus.
Περιττό να πω ότι δεν εκπλήσσομαι όταν ακούω τις ειλικρινείς ομολογίες αυτών των ηλικιωμένων Κυπρίων που θυμούνται μια εποχή ευδαιμονίας και ενότητας. Η μια κοινή και ηχηρή «αλήθεια» που αποκαλύπτεται από το κάθε άτομο ήταν ότι υπήρχε κάποιος καιρός στην Κύπρο που οι Μουσουλμάνοι και οι Χριστιανοί συνυπήρχαν χωρίς κακία, προκατάληψη ή διάκριση. «Ήμασταν σαν αδέλφια» είναι μια επαναλαμβανόμενη δήλωση.
Εν πάση περιπτώσει, αρκετά από εμένα – θα σας αφήσω να διαβάσετε μόνοι σας αυτές τις ζωντανές αναμνήσεις.
(Παρακαλώ σημειώστε: Η λέξη Τούρκος ή Τουρκικό σε αυτά τα κείμενα αναφέρεται σε Κύπριους που είναι Μουσουλμάνοι).

ΛΟΥΚΑΣ ΑΝΔΡΟΝΙΚΟΥ από το χωριό Δρομολαξιά στη Λάρνακα.
Η ποδοσφαιρική μου ομάδα είχε μερικούς σπουδαίους παίκτες. Είχαμε τους Nazim Ali, Huseyin Alaman, Zekai και Mustafa. Παίζαμε μαζί ενωμένοι ως μια μεγάλη ευτυχισμένη ομάδα. Δεν υπήρχαν θέματα. Ο φίλος μου Nazim Ali έπαιξε κάποτε σε ένα ελληνικό θεατρικό έργο και ήταν τόσο αφοσιωμένος στο ρόλο του που κατάφερε να μάθει τα λόγια του και τα έλεγε σε τέλεια Ελληνικά. Αγαπούσαν τις παραδόσεις μας και αγαπούσαμε τις δικές τους. Ήμασταν οι ίδιοι.
Ο πατέρας μου συνήθιζε να μου λέγει ότι τον παλιό καιρό υπήρχε ένα καφενείο που ανήκε στο Hala Sultan Tekke και είχαν καφέ, ζάχαρη και μια φωτιά με κάρβουνα που ήταν πάντοτε αναμμένη. Οι ιδιοκτήτες του καφενείου επέτρεπαν στους Χριστιανούς να έρθουν οποιαδήποτε ώρα και να χρησιμοποιήσουν τη φωτιά για να φτιάξουν τον καφέ τους χωρίς καμιά διάκριση. Υπήρχε τότε τέτοια ανοικτή φιλοξενία.

ΝΙΝΑ ΑΝΔΡΟΝΙΚΟΥ από το χωριό Δρομολαξιά στη Λάρνακα.
Γεννήθηκα στον Τούρκικο μαχαλά. Μεγάλωσα ανάμεσα στους Τουρκοκύπριους μέχρι την ηλικία των 20 χρόνων. Περνούσαμε τόσο καλά, εννοώ εξαιρετικά καλά. Δεν σκεφτόμουν να πάω και να παίξω με τους Ελληνοκύπριους στο χωριό. Όλη μέρα ήμουν με τις Τουρκοπούλες: παίζαμε, τρέχαμε. Ήταν χαρούμενος καιρός για μένα. Τι να σου πω; Ποτέ δεν ήμασταν χωριστά. Τις θυμούμαι όλες ακόμα και σήμερα. Ήταν η Hatice, η Neriman, η Havva. Ήμασταν όλη μέρα μαζί – όλη μέρα.
Θυμούμαι που πήγαινα στους γάμους τους. Καθόμασταν όλοι μαζί σε ένα μεγάλο δωμάτιο – όλες γυναίκες και ο βιολιστής έπαιζε κομμάτια. Ο βιολιστής ήταν τυφλός. Δεν του επιτρεπόταν να δει τις γυναίκες. Ήταν ένα δωμάτιο γεμάτο γυναίκες και η νύφη ήταν εκεί ντυμένη και όμορφη. Υπήρχαν γυναίκες που έβαφαν τη νύφη με χέννα. Μέναμε σε εκείνο το δωμάτιο για τρεις μέρες. Κάθε νύκτα η νύφη φορούσε διαφορετικό φόρεμα. Την πρώτη νύκτα το φόρεμα της ήταν τριανταφυλλί χρώμα, τη δεύτερη μπλε και την τελευταία νύκτα το φόρεμα της ήταν άσπρο. Οι άντρες ήταν ξεχωριστά από τις γυναίκες. Γιόρταζαν όλοι στο καφενείο με τα μπρούντζινα μουσικά τους όργανα και τα τύμπανα τους.

ΠΑΝΑΓΙΩΤΑ ΣΟΛΩΜΗ από το χωριό Κώμη Κεπήρ στην Αμμόχωστο.
Από τον καιρό που ήμασταν μωρά παίζαμε μαζί με τα μικρά Τουρκόπουλα στο χωριό. Η φίλη μου ήταν η Serife. Ο πατέρας μου δούλευε με τον Ibrahim και ήταν σαν αδέλφια. Ποτέ δεν είχαμε πρόβλημα. Ποτέ, ποτέ δεν είχαμε κακά αισθήματα προς τους Τούρκους γείτονες μας.

ΠΑΝΑΓΙΩΤΗΣ ΚΚΛΟΣ από το χωριό Ίνια στην Πάφο.
Τέλειωσα το δημοτικό σχολείο στο χωριό μου την Ίνια το 1945. Η μητέρα μου που ήταν χήρα μεγάλωσε επτά παιδιά και δεν είχε την οικονομική άνεση να με στείλει στο Γυμνάσιο στο Κτήμα. Η μοίρα μου ήταν να γίνω βοσκός. Ο παππούς μου Χαράλαμπος όμως, (ο Θεός να τον ευλογεί) με λυπήθηκε και κανόνισε να με στείλει σε ένα Τουρκικό σχολείο στις Αρόδες. Έτσι, ξυπόλυτος με το γάιδαρο μου ταξιδέψαμε μαζί στις Αρόδες όπου συναντήσαμε το δάσκαλο Mustapha. Ο δάσκαλος με δέχτηκε στην τάξη του χωρίς δισταγμό. Με έβαλε να καθίσω μπροστά στην τάξη δίπλα από ένα αγόρι που ονομαζόταν Ahmet. Εκείνο τον καιρό δεν επιτρεπόταν η διδασκαλία της Ελληνικής γλώσσας στα Τουρκικά σχολεία, αλλά παρ' όλα αυτά ο δάσκαλος μετάφραζε το μάθημα στα Ελληνικά μόνο για μένα. Σιγά σιγά μπορούσα να μιλώ Τουρκικά και έτσι συμπλήρωσα όλα τα μαθήματα μου με ψηλή βαθμολογία. Οι συμμαθητές μου με δέχτηκαν από την αρχή και με αγαπούσαν όπως τους αγαπούσα και εγώ.

ΝΙΚΟΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ από το χωριό Πεντάκωμο στη Λεμεσό.
Ζούσαμε πραγματικά πολύ καλά μαζί. Δεν είχαμε καθόλου προβλήματα. Αν κάποιος επισκεπτόταν το χωριό δεν μπορούσε να ξεχωρίσει ποιος ήταν Τούρκος και ποιος Έλληνας. Σου λέω, φαινόμασταν και συμπεριφερόμασταν το ίδιο. Μιλούσαν τη γλώσσα μας όπως εμείς, ακριβώς το ίδιο. Δεν υπήρχε διαφορά. Ήμασταν σαν αδέλφια.

ΚΩΣΤΑΚΗΣ ΠΑΝΑΓΗ από το χωριό Πεντάκωμο στη Λεμεσό.
Πάντοτε ήμασταν μαζί. Ποτέ κανένας δεν διέκρινε αν ήσουν Χριστιανός ή Μουσουλμάνος. Πίναμε μαζί, γιορτάζαμε μαζί, πηγαίναμε ο ένας στους γάμους του άλλου, στα καφενεία ο ένας του άλλου μαζί και παίζαμε χαρτιά μαζί. Ήμασταν σαν αδέλφια.

ΣΤΕΛΙΟΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ από το χωριό Πεντάκωμο στη Λεμεσό.
Είχα πολλούς Μουσουλμάνους φίλους. Ήταν ο Kemal, ο Turan, ο Beyzade και ο Hasancik. Με το μικρο Hasancik παίζαμε πάλη για να διασκεδάζουν οι μεγαλύτεροι. Καθόμασταν όλοι μαζί σε μεγάλες τρύπες στο έδαφος, τρώγαμε μαζί, μιλούσαμε και ακόμα κοιμόμασταν μαζί στις μεγάλες τρύπες με τα κοπάδια μας κοντά.

ΚΑΤΕΡΙΝΑ ΠΑΤΣΑΛΟΥ από το χωριό Περιστερώνα στην Πάφο.
Δεν ήμασταν διαφορετικοί. Όταν οι Τουρκάλες είχαν γάλα μου έφερναν φρέσκα αναρή. Όταν είχαν καρπούζια, μας έδιναν λίγα. Περνούσαμε πολύ καλά μαζί. Όταν η γειτόνισσα ζύμωνε ψωμί, μου φώναζε στο σπίτι της για να φάμε μαζί. Ήμασταν το ίδιο. Μοιραζόμασταν τόσα πολλά μαζί. Τη νύκτα, αν περπατούσα με άλλα κορίτσια σε ένα στενό μονοπάτι, οι Τούρκοι άντρες παραμέριζαν στον τοίχο και μας άφηναν αρκετό χώρο για να περπατήσουμε χωρίς δυσκολία. Όχι, φίλε μου, περνούσαμε πολύ καλά μαζί. Δεν γνώρισα κανένα τότε που είχε πρόβλημα με τους Τούρκους.

ΚΥΡΙΑΚΟΣ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΥ από το χωριό Περιστερώνα στην Πάφο.
Ο πατέρας μου έκτιζε σπίτια για τους Τούρκους στο χωριό. Εκείνο τον καιρό δεν υπήρχαν λεφτά και αγωνιζόταν για να αγοράσει εξοπλισμό και υλικά. Ένας Τούρκος φίλος με το όνομα Mumtaz δάνεισε στον πατέρα μου 200 λίρες για να αγοράσει ένα μηχάνημα που χρειαζόταν. Με την απίστευτη γενναιοδωρία του Τούρκου, ο πατέρας μου κατάφερε να συνεχίσει να κτίζει τα σπίτια του. Διακόσιες λίρες ήταν πολλά λεφτά τότε. Ο πατέρας μου θα χρειαζόταν να πουλήσει γη ή να χρεωθεί για να πάρει τέτοια χρήματα. Χάρη στο Mumtaz όμως δεν χρειάστηκε να το κάνει αυτό.

ΧΡΥΣΤΑΛΛΑ ΛΟΥΚΙΑ από το χωριό Ασώματος στη Λεμεσό.
Να σου πω μια ιστορία. Όταν ήμουν μικρή οι γονείς μου αρρώστησαν πολύ και τους έστειλαν στο νοσοκομείο. Η μεγαλύτερη μου αδελφή που ήταν 10 χρονών τότε έπρεπε να μας φροντίζει και τα τέσσερα παιδιά. Ήταν οι καλοί μας γείτονες Abdullah και Hatice που παρέμβηκαν και μας βοήθησαν. Σκότωσαν ένα κουνέλι και βοήθησαν την αδελφή μου να ετοιμάσει φαγητό για να μας ταΐσει. Δεν μπορείς να ξεχάσεις τέτοιες πράξεις καλοσύνης.

ΓΙΑΝΝΟΥΛΛΑ ΒΡΟΝΤΗ από το χωριό Αμπελίκου στη Λεμεσό.
Περνούσαμε πολύ καλά με τους Τούρκους γείτονες μας. Θυμούμαι όταν ήμουν παιδί πήγαινα και παρακολουθούσα τον κουκλοθέατρο με τον Καραγκιόζη στο καφενείο. Καθόμασταν όλοι μαζί, Χριστιανοί και Μουσουλμάνοι. Δεν μπορούσες να μας χωρίσεις. Δεν υπήρχε άλλη διασκέδαση εκείνη την εποχή. Αργότερα μόνο ανακαλύψαμε το σινεμά.

ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ ΑΡΙΣΤΑΡΧΟΥ από το χωριό Καλαβασός στη Λάρνακα.
Περνούσαμε μια χαρά με τους Τούρκους γείτονες μας. Υπήρχε τόση πολλή εμπιστοσύνη μεταξύ μας. Ο Halil, ο φίλος του πατέρα μου έβαζε εμένα και την αδελφή μου στον γάιδαρο του και τον συνοδεύαμε στα χωράφια του όποτε έσπερνε ή αλώνιζε. Δύο μικρά κορίτσια σε ένα γάιδαρο. Έφερνε το πουργούρι του και του μαγειρεύαμε.

ΘΕΚΛΑ ΣΑΒΒΑ από το χωριό Καλαβασός στη Λάρνακα.
Ο σύζυγος μου είχε παγιδευτεί κάτω από ένα φορτηγό και οι Τούρκοι ήρθαν για να τον σώσουν. Τον έφεραν στο σπίτι μου μισοπεθαμένο και κάθε μέρα ερχόντουσαν για να δουν πως είναι και αν χρειαζόμουν βοήθεια: τόσο καλοί άνθρωποι. Ακόμα και οι δικοί μας άνθρωποι δεν νοιάζονταν τόσο. Ήμασταν σαν αδέλφια. Υπήρχε ένας άντρας, ο Sevket. Τι καταπληκτικό άτομο ήταν: τέτοια καλοσύνη προς την οικογένεια μου. Έβλεπε τα παιδιά μου που πήγαιναν περπατητοί στο σχολείο και φώναζε «Ντόροθι, Ρένα ελάτε να σας δώσω παγωτό.» Ποτέ δεν δεχόταν να πληρωθεί. Ποτέ. Στο δικό μου γάμο είχαμε ένα Τούρκο κουμπάρο. Χορεύαμε μαζί. Αδέλφια σας λέω. Δεν μπορώ να σας περιγράψω πόσο καλά περνούσαμε μαζί.

www.talesofcyprus.com

(*) Article published in POLITIS newspaper on the 23rd of July 2017, Sunday.

Tales of Cyprus from another time: When we had not been divided… (Part A)

Tales of Cyprus from another time: When we had not been divided… (Part A)

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Tel: 99 966518

Constantinos Emmanuelle who created `Tales of Cyprus` on the internet has compiled stories from our good friends Huseyin Halil and Christalla Avgousti who have been going around the island, compiling stories from our past on RIK2 in their wonderful programme called `Under the Same Sky`… Constantinos Emmanuel says:
`The following transcripts are taken from video interviews conducted by my friend Huseyin Halil for RIK2. Huseyin and his film crew travelled around the island interviewing elderly Greek and Turkish Cypriots to find out how the two communities co-existed before 1950. I am grateful to have been allowed permission to translate some of these interviews into English for Tales of Cyprus.
Needless to say, I am not surprised to hear the heartfelt confessions of these elderly Cypriots who recall a time of bliss and unity. The one common and resounding 'truth' revealed by each person was that there was once a time in Cyprus when Muslims and Christians co-existed without malice, prejudice or discrimination. "We were like brothers," is a reoccurring statement.
Anyway, enough from me – I'll let you read these living memories for yourself.
(Please note: The word Turk or Turkish in these transcripts refers to Cypriots who are Muslim).

OURANIA PETROU PELOPITHA FROM ANOGYRA VILLAGE, LIMASSOL.
I remember when Afet was getting married and she chose my sister Vasiliki to be her 'koumera' (maid of honour). On the day of her wedding she was bragging to the whole village that it was the Christian girls who dressed her. We were so close, so close. It pains me to think about those days; such a shame.

ANTHOULLA LOUROUTSATI FROM LURUCINA VILLAGE, NICOSIA.
When I was a child we played with all the children in the neighbourhood. Not one person would care or distinguish whether you were Muslim or Christian. It was never discussed. As far as we were concerned, we were all the same. Everyone spoke Greek you see. After school we worked in the fields together, I would sew and embroider with the Turkish women. My friend Ayse would bring her machine to my house. We got along extremely well.

NICHOLAS HADIGIVANAKIS – AKAKI VILLAGE, NICOSIA.
Don't believe what anyone says - we didn't have any problems with the Turks. We lived together, we worked together, and we celebrated together. We were like brothers. I remember the Hoja in the next village had a general store and everybody would come from all around to shop there. Everybody. I'm waiting and I'm praying for the day when we can all live together once again; the way it used to be.

TROFAS IROTHOTOU – LEFKE VILLAGE, NICOSIA.
I remember Enver son of Naim. We were together from sixteen years old working for Yianni the painter. Enver's father had an orange grove and once a week Enver would bring me a sack of oranges. At the market you would pay two shillings for sack this size and here was my friend Enver giving me one sack every week. We loved and cared for each other very much. We didn't have any problems with the Turks in the village. At the coffee houses we were always together. We played cards together, mupa (football) together, baseball – whatever it was we were always together. I feel like crying when I think about it because actually we didn't have a problem.

NIKOS KONSTANTINOU - AMARGETI VILLAGE – PAPHOS.
Honestly the only trouble I can remember was when one of our Greek girls in the village fell in love with a Turkish boy. The problem was that this girl was already married but did not like her husband so she ran off with the Turkish boy. After a few stones were thrown things settled down and the girl eventually went on to marry the Turkish boy and had a family. That was the only incident that occurred in our village that I can remember. Of course we are talking before 1953.

CHRISANTHOS XENOFONDOS - AMARGETI VILLAGE – PAPHOS.
By luck I was born in a house opposite a little orphaned Turkish girl who was the same age as me. We played together every day. I would go to her house and she would come to my house. We played together, every day until we were six years old. The point I'm making is that we were allowed to be together. My father always worked alongside the Turks in the village.

CHRYSTOTHOLOS LOIZOU - AMARGETI VILLAGE – PAPHOS.
Five, six Turkish boys that I knew – we played together. They would come to my house and I would go to their house. My father was a farmer, we were quite poor and these boys would come and help us with threshing and whatever was required. My mother would always arrive with something hot to feed us all in the fields.

ANDREAS KAIZER - AMARGETI VILLAGE – PAPHOS.
Our church and the Tzami (mosque) were opposite each other. When the Turks were celebrating Bayrami the school children and the people at the kafenion would go over to wish them a good Bayrami. When it was our Easter they would come over to us to wish us a 'kalo paska' (Good Easter) and we would give them flaounes and sweets. We lived together peacefully and we worked together peacefully. We strived to help each other with everything; with the flour milling; with the threshing; with the grape picking; whatever needed to be done. Religion didn't come into it. We went to church they went to the mosque. I remember on Good Friday the Turks in the village would line the streets to bear witness to the procession of the Epitaphios (Επιτάφιος). There was respect for one another and our own religious rites.

ANNA KATSOURA - ANGLISIDES VILLAGE – LARNACA.
We went to each other's wedding. We would loan each other tables and chairs for the reception and helped with the food and drink. We danced and sang together all night and then we even slept all together. Doesn't that sound nice?

SOPHIA MICHALI - ANGLISIDES VILLAGE – LARNACA.
All the neighbours around us were Turkish. But we didn't refer to them as Turkish back them. There was Yusef over there, Huseyin across the road. We didn't distinguish them as Turkish. We were all the same. They had Muslim names and we had Christian names.

ANDREAS MICHALI - ANGLISIDES VILLAGE – LARNACA.
Kemal was my best friend. He was a great guy. I remember his father was rather tight-fisted and wouldn't give him any money so I would help out where I could and buy him cigarettes and stuff that he wanted. Kemal had the first bike in our village. He taught me how to ride. We would roam the countryside together. We were such good friends. One evening he said to me 'Andrea, let's ride to Scala.' So off we went; it was night-time; eighteen miles each way. He was such a great friend.

ANDREAS PAPANEOPHYTOU – FROM STRONGYLOS, FAMAGUSTA.
During those times there was no difference between the Turkish and Greek inhabitants. We were all Cypriots. We worked together, we danced together and we sang together. At many of our weddings whoever had Muslim friends they would invite them to attend. After all, our dances were the same and when we sang our voices were the same. Our primary concern was to see how we might be able to help each other with our work and the jobs of the village.
I remember playing mupa (football) with my friends Mustapha, Andreas, Ahmet and Giorgos. We played together, we went to each other's house and there was never a reason for us to be separated. Our parents approved and the community was as one. Even when our priest would walk down the road all my friends, Muslim and Christian alike would offer him the same respect and courtesy.
I remember one day when Mustapha was racing around the village on a rather large mule. He was a zizanio (cheeky) like me and he loved to race his mules. Unfortunately something happened and the mule tripped and Mustapha was thrown from the animal and crashed onto the stony path. His hair was pulled back from the skin to reveal a bloodied scalp. He was hurt very bad. The Mukhtari who had the only vehicle in the village drove the boy to the doctor. The mother of Mustapha besotted by grief for her son grabbed some oil and rushed straight to our church to light a candle and pray to the saint Agios Spyridonas. The boy was saved and when he returned to the village, his mother made a point of tell everyone that it was the saint that saved his life.

DIMITRIS DIMITRIOU – LAPITHOS VILLAGE
When I was growing up I couldn't tell the difference between the Turkish and Greek Cypriots in the village. We were all the same. We grew up as one family. One family. We were poor, and we all worked hard. Our parents were illiterate so they worked hard to send their children to school.
I made friends with Muslims. I remember my classmates Mehmet, Adnan, Ertan Oz and Salih. These were my friends. If they had Bayrami we went. When we had Pascha they came to ours. We were always together. We went to each other's weddings too. No one said or cared if you were Christian or Muslim. I am Dimitri: you are Sait. That was the way it was.

www.talesofcyprus.com

(*) Article published in the POLITIS newspaper on the 16th of July, 2017 Sunday.

Ιστορίες της Κύπρου από μια άλλη εποχή: Όταν δεν είχαμε διαιρεθεί… (μέρος Α)

Ιστορίες της Κύπρου από μια άλλη εποχή: Όταν δεν είχαμε διαιρεθεί… (μέρος Α)

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Τηλ: 99 966518

Ο Constantinos Emmanuelle, που δημιούργησε το «Tales of Cyprus» (Ιστορίες της Κύπρου) στο διαδίκτυο, έχει συντάξει ιστορίες από τους καλούς μας φίλους Huseyin Halil και Χρυστάλα Αυγουστή που γυρίζουν του νησί και μαζεύουν ιστορίες από το παρελθόν μας για το υπέροχο τους πρόγραμμα το ΡΙΚ2 «Κάτω από τον ίδιο ουρανό»… Ο Constantinos Emmanuelle λέει:
«Τα ακόλουθα προέρχονται από την απομαγνητοσκόπηση των βιντεογραφημένων συνεντεύξεων που διενέργησε ο φίλος μου Huseyin Halil για το ΡΙΚ2. Ο Huseyin και το κινηματογραφικό του συνεργείο ταξίδεψαν σε όλο το νησί και έπαιρναν συνεντεύξεις από ηλικιωμένους Ελληνοκύπριους και Τουρκοκύπριους έτσι ώστε να μάθουν πως οι δύο κοινότητες συνυπήρχαν πριν το 1950. Είμαι ευγνώμων που μου δόθηκε η άδεια να μεταφράσω στα αγγλικά κάποιες από αυτές τις συνεντεύξεις για το Tales of Cyprus.
Περιττό να πω ότι δεν εκπλήσσομαι όταν ακούω τις ειλικρινείς ομολογίες αυτών των ηλικιωμένων Κυπρίων που θυμούνται μια εποχή ευδαιμονίας και ενότητας. Η μια κοινή και ηχηρή «αλήθεια» που αποκαλύπτεται από το κάθε άτομο ήταν ότι υπήρχε κάποιος καιρός στην Κύπρο που οι Μουσουλμάνοι και οι Χριστιανοί συνυπήρχαν χωρίς κακία, προκατάληψη ή διάκριση. «Ήμασταν σαν αδέλφια» είναι μια επαναλαμβανόμενη δήλωση.
Εν πάση περιπτώσει, αρκετά από εμένα – θα σας αφήσω να διαβάσετε μόνοι σας αυτές τις ζωντανές αναμνήσεις.
(Παρακαλώ σημειώστε: Η λέξη Τούρκος ή Τουρκικό σε αυτά τα κείμενα αναφέρεται σε Κύπριους που είναι Μουσουλμάνοι).

ΟΥΡΑΝΙΑ ΠΕΤΡΟΥ ΠΕΛΟΠΙΔΑ από το χωριό Ανώγυρα στη Λεμεσό.
Θυμούμαι όταν η Afet θα παντρευόταν και επέλεξε την αδελφή μου Βασιλική να είναι η «κουμέρα» της. Τη μέρα του γάμου της καυχιόταν σε ολόκληρο το χωριό ότι ήταν οι Χριστιανές κοπέλες που την είχαν ντύσει. Ήμασταν τόσο κοντά, τόσο κοντά ο ένας στον άλλο. Με θλίβει να σκέφτομαι για εκείνες τις μέρες, τόσο κρίμα.

ΑΝΘΟΥΛΑ ΛΟΥΡΟΥΤΖΙΑΤΗ από το χωριό Λουρουτζίνα στη Λευκωσία.
Όταν ήμουν παιδί παίζαμε με όλα τα παιδιά στη γειτονιά. Κανένας δεν νοιαζόταν ή διαχώριζε αν ήσουν Μουσουλμάνος ή Χριστιανός. Ποτέ δεν συζητιόταν. Όσο μας αφορούσε, ήμασταν όλοι οι ίδιοι. Βλέπετε, όλοι μιλούσαν Ελληνικά. Μετά το σχολείο εργαζόμασταν μαζί στα χωράφια, έραβα και κεντούσα με τις Τουρκάλες γυναίκες. Η φίλη μου Ayse έφερνε τη ραπτομηχανή της στο σπίτι μου. Περνούμε πολύ καλά μαζί.

ΝΙΚΟΛΑΣ ΧΑΤΖΗΓΙΒΑΝΑΚΗΣ από το χωριό Ακάκι στη Λευκωσία.
Μην πιστεύεις ότι λέει ο καθένας – δεν είχαμε προβλήματα με τους Τούρκους. Ζούσαμε μαζί, δουλεύαμε μαζί, γιορτάζαμε μαζί. Ήμασταν σαν αδέλφια. Θυμούμαι το χότζα στο διπλανό χωριό, που είχε κατάστημα και όλοι έρχονταν από παντού για να ψωνίσουν από εκεί. Όλοι. Περιμένω και προσεύχομαι για τη μέρα που θα μπορούμε να ζούμε όλοι μαζί ξανά, όπως ήταν παλιά.

ΤΡΟΦΑΣ ΗΡΟΔΟΤΟΥ από το χωριό Λεύκα στη Λευκωσία.
Θυμούμαι τον Enver, γιο του Naim. Ήμασταν μαζί από δεκαέξι χρονών και δουλεύαμε για το Γιάννη τον μπογιατζή. Ο πατέρας του Enver είχε πορτοκαλεώνα και μια φορά τη βδομάδα ο Enver μου έφερνε ένα σάκο πορτοκάλια. Στην αγορά πλήρωνες δύο σελίνια για ένα τόσο μεγάλο σάκο και ο φίλος μου ο Enver μου έδινε ένα σάκο τη βδομάδα. Αγαπούσαμε και νοιαζόμασταν πολύ ο ένας για τον άλλο. Δεν είχαμε προβλήματα με τους Τούρκους στο χωριό. Στα καφενεία πάντοτε ήμασταν μαζί. Θέλω να κλαίω όταν το σκέφτομαι διότι στην πραγματικότητα δεν είχαμε πρόβλημα.

ΝΙΚΟΣ ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ από το χωριό Αμαργέτη στην Πάφο.
Ειλικρινά το μόνο πρόβλημα που θυμούμαι ήταν όταν μια από τις Ελληνίδες κοπέλες στο χωριό ερωτεύτηκε ένα Τούρκο αγόρι. Το πρόβλημα ήταν ότι η κοπέλα αυτή ήταν ήδη παντρεμένη αλλά δεν της άρεσε ο άντρας της έτσι έφυγε με τον Τούρκο. Μετά που ρίχθηκαν μερικές πέτρες, τα πράγματα ηρέμησαν και η κοπέλα παντρεύτηκε τον Τούρκο αγόρι και έκαναν οικογένεια. Αυτό ήταν το μόνο περιστατικό που μπορώ να θυμηθώ ότι συνέβηκε στο χωριό μας. Φυσικά μιλούμε για πριν το 1953.

ΧΡΥΣΑΝΘΟΣ ΞΕΝΟΦΩΝΤΟΣ από το χωριό Αμαργέτη στην Πάφο.
Από τύχη γεννήθηκα σε ένα σπίτι απέναντι από μια Τουρκοπούλα που ήταν στην ίδια ηλικία με μένα. Παίζαμε μαζί κάθε μέρα. Πήγαινα στο σπίτι της και ερχόταν στο δικό μου. Παίζαμε μαζί, κάθε μέρα μέχρι την ηλικία των έξι χρόνων. Το σημείο που θέλω να θίξω είναι ότι μας επιτρεπόταν να είμαστε μαζί. Ο πατέρας μου πάντοτε δούλευε μαζί με τους Τούρκους στο χωριό.

ΧΡΙΣΤΟΔΟΥΛΟΣ ΛΟΙΖΟΥ από το χωριό Αμαργέτη στην Πάφο.
Ήξερα πέντε, έξι Τούρκους αγόρια – παίζαμε μαζί. Έρχονταν στο σπίτι μου και πήγαινα στο δικό τους. Ο πατέρας μου ήταν αγρότης, ήμασταν αρκετά φτωχοί και τα αγόρια αυτά έρχονταν και μας βοηθούσαν με το αλώνισμα και οτιδήποτε ήταν απαραίτητο. Η μητέρα μου πάντα ερχόταν με κάτι ζεστό για να φάμε όλοι μας στα χωράφια.

ΑΝΤΡΕΑΣ ΚΑΙΖΕΡ από το χωριό Αμαργέτη στην Πάφο.
Η εκκλησία μας και το τζαμί ήταν απέναντι. Όταν οι Τούρκοι γιόρταζαν το Μπαϊράμι τα παιδιά του σχολείου και οι άνθρωποι στο καφενείο πήγαιναν για να τους ευχηθούν καλό Μπαϊράμι. Όταν ήταν το Πάσχα μας, ερχόντουσαν σε μας και μας εύχονταν «Καλό Πάσχα» και τους δίναμε φλαούνες και γλυκά. Ζούσαμε μαζί ειρηνικά και εργαζόμασταν μαζί ειρηνικά. Προσπαθούσαμε να βοηθήσουμε ο ένας τον άλλο με τα πάντα – με το άλεσμα του αλευριού, το αλώνισμα, το μάζεμα των σταφυλιών, οτιδήποτε χρειαζόταν να γίνει. Η θρησκεία δεν είχε ρόλο. Πηγαίναμε στην εκκλησία και πήγαιναν στο τζαμί. Θυμούμαι τη Μεγάλη Παρασκευή τους Τούρκους στο χωριό που στέκονταν στην άκρια των δρόμων για να παρακολουθήσουν τη λιτανεία του Επιταφίου. Υπήρχε σεβασμός από τον ένα στον άλλο και τις δικές μας θρησκευτικές τελετουργίες.
ΑΝΝΑ ΚΑΤΣΟΥΡΑ από το χωριό Αγγλισίδες στη Λάρνακα.
Πηγαίναμε ο ένας στο γάμο του άλλου. Δανείζαμε ο ένας στον άλλο τα τραπέζια και τις καρέκλες για τη δεξίωση και βοηθούσαμε με το φαγητό και το ποτό. Χορεύαμε και τραγουδούσαμε μαζί και μετά κοιμόμασταν και μαζί όλοι μας. Δεν ακούγεται ωραίο;

ΣΟΦΙΑ ΜΙΧΑΛΗ από το χωριό Αγγλισίδες στη Λάρνακα.
Όλοι οι γείτονες γύρω μας ήταν Τούρκοι. Αλλά δεν τους λέγαμε Τούρκους τότε. Ήταν ο Yusef εκεί, o Huseyin απέναντι. Δεν τους διακρίναμε ως Τούρκους. Είμαστε όλοι το ίδιο. Είχαν μουσουλμανικά ονόματα και είχαμε Χριστιανικά ονόματα.

ΑΝΤΡΕΑΣ ΜΙΧΑΛΗ από το χωριό Αγγλισίδες στη Λάρνακα.
Ο Kemal ήταν ο καλύτερος μου φίλος. Ήταν εξαιρετικός τύπος. Θυμούμαι τον πατέρα του ότι ήταν μάλλον σφικτός και δεν του έδινε λεφτά έτσι τον βοηθούσα και του αγόραζα τσιγάρα και πράγματα που ήθελε. Ο Kemal είχε το πρώτο ποδήλατο στο χωριό μας. Με έμαθε να οδηγώ ποδήλατο. Γυρίζαμε μαζί στην εξοχή. Είμαστε τόσο καλοί φίλοι. Ένα βράδυ μου είπε «Αντρέα, ας πάμε στη Σκάλα με το ποδήλατο.» Έτσι πήγαμε – ήταν βράδυ, δεκαοκτώ μίλια δρόμος να πας και δεκαοκτώ να έρθεις. Ήταν τόσο σπουδαίος φίλος.

ΑΝΔΡΕΑΣ ΠΑΠΑΝΕΟΦΥΤΟΥ από το χωριό Στρογγυλός στην Αμμόχωστο.
Εκείνο τον καιρό δεν υπήρχε διαφορά μεταξύ Τούρκων και Ελλήνων κατοίκων. Ήμασταν όλοι Κύπριοι. Εργαζόμασταν μαζί, χορεύαμε μαζί και τραγουδούσαμε μαζί. Σε πολλούς από τους γάμους μας όσοι είχαν Μουσουλμάνους φίλους τους προσκαλούσαν να παρευρεθούν. Στο κάτω-κάτω οι χοροί μας ήταν οι ίδιοι και όταν τραγουδούσαμε οι φωνές μας ήταν οι ίδιες. Το κύριο μας μέλημα ήταν πως θα μπορούσαμε να βοηθήσουμε ο ένας τον άλλο με τη δουλειά μας και τις εργασίες του χωριού.
Θυμούμαι να παίζω μάππα (ποδόσφαιρο) με τους φίλους μου Mustapha, Αντρέα, Ahmet και Γιώργο. Παίζαμε μαζί, πηγαίναμε ο ένας στο σπίτι του άλλου και ποτέ δεν υπήρχε λόγος για μας να είμαστε χωριστά. Οι γονείς μας το ενέκριναν και η κοινότητα ήταν μια. Ακόμα και όταν ο ιερέας μας περπατούσε στο δρόμο, όλοι οι φίλοι μου και Μουσουλμάνοι και Χριστιανοί του έδειχναν τον ίδιο σεβασμό και ευγένεια.
Θυμούμαι μια μέρα όταν ο Mustapha έτρεχε μέσα στο χωριό πάνω σε ένα αρκετά μεγάλο μουλάρι. Ήταν ένα ζιζάνιο όπως και εγώ και αγαπούσε πολύ να τρέχει με τα μουλάρια του. Δυστυχώς κάτι συνέβηκε και το μουλάρι σκόνταψε και έριξε το Mustapha και κτύπησε πάνω στο πέτρινο μονοπάτι. Του τράβηξαν πίσω τα μαλλιά του και φάνηκε το ματωμένο του κεφάλι. Τραυματίστηκε πολύ άσχημα. Ο μουχτάρης, που είχε το μόνο αυτοκίνητο στο χωριό, οδήγησε το αγόρι στο γιατρό. Η μητέρα του Mustapha γεμάτη θλίψη για το γιο της άρπαξε λίγο λάδι και έτρεξε στην εκκλησία για να ανάψει ένα κερί και να προσευχηθεί στον Άγιο Σπυρίδωνα. Το αγόρι σώθηκε και όταν επέστρεψε στο χωριό η μητέρα του επεσήμανε σε όλους ότι ήταν ο άγιος που του έσωσε τη ζωή.

ΔΗΜΗΤΡΗΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ από το χωριό Λάπηθος.
Όταν μεγάλωνα δεν μπορούσα να ξεχωρίσω μεταξύ Τούρκων και Ελληνοκυπρίων στο χωριό. Ήμασταν όλοι οι ίδιοι. Μεγαλώσαμε σαν μια οικογένεια. Μια οικογένεια. Ήμασταν φτωχοί, όλοι δουλεύαμε σκληρά. Οι γονείς μας ήταν αγράμματοι έτσι δούλευαν σκληρά για να στείλουν τα παιδιά τους στο σχολείο.
Ήμουν φίλος με τους Μουσουλμάνους. Θυμούμαι τους συμμαθητές μου Mehmet, Adnan, Ertan Oz και Salih. Αυτοί ήταν οι φίλοι μου. Όταν είχαν Μπαϊράμι πηγαίναμε. Όταν είχαμε το Πάσχα έρχονταν σε μας. Ήμασταν πάντα μαζί. Πηγαίναμε και στους γάμους ο ένας του άλλου. Κανένας έλεγε ή νοιαζόταν αν ήσουν Χριστιανός ή Μουσουλμάνος. Είμαι ο Δημήτρης και είσαι ο Sait. Έτσι ήταν τα πράγματα.

www.talesofcyprus.com

(*) Article published in the POLITIS newspaper on the 16th of July, 2017 Sunday.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Kypros Dimosthenous telling the story of the bombing of the Athalassa Psychiatric Hospital in 1974…

Kypros Dimosthenous telling the story of the bombing of the Athalassa Psychiatric Hospital in 1974…

Sevgul Uludag

caramel_cy@yahoo.com

Tel: 99 966518

He called me one morning when my article about the bombing of the Athalassa Psychiatric Hospital was published in the POLITIS newspaper and he sounded upset… He wanted to correct something: It was very important for him to stress that no, there were no anti-aircraft guns on top of the hospital… He had been a nurse in the hospital but not any nurse, someone responsible together with his wife and he invited me to his house to speak in detail. I would get a taxi in the following days and go to his house at Aglandjia to meet Kypros Dimosthenous and his wife Elli or rather "Lilly" as they had called her…
We would sit and talk in their lovely house and he and Lilly would tell me the tragic story of the Athalassa Psychiatric Hospital – how it was bombed by Turkish war planes on the 20th of July 1974 from around 9 o'clock in the morning till about 13.30 and how 31 patients died, how others wounded, how he had to collect the pieces of bodies since a big bomb fell in one of the wards, killing everyone and tearing them to pieces and how he would bury them in the crater in the middle of the ward, created by the bomb…
Born in 1940, Kypros Dimosthenous was from Nicosia – he lived all his life in the area of Aglandjia except when he had gone to London to study… He had five sisters and himself, the only son of the family… When he graduated from high school in 1957, a pharmacist friend of his had told him to join the nursing sector since at that time the government was paying better wages than the private sector. So he chose nursing and in 1958 he would be sent to England to study in the school of nursing for three years… He would stay on some more to make some money in order to be able to come back and he would come back to Cyprus in 1962… On his return, he would be employed at the Nicosia Psychiatric Hospital. At that time this hospital was next to the Hilton Hotel and would stay there until 1964. In 1964 the Athalassa Psychiatric Hospital would be built and they would move there in August 1964.
Until 1974, the patients were from all communities: Greek Cypriots, Turkish Cypriots, Armenian Cypriots, Maronite Cypriots were all being treated in the same hospital – they had around 900 patients! Until 1963, there were also Turkish Cypriot nurses working together and in one night, after the conflict of 1963 December, they would stop coming anymore… But he still remembers Djihan, Sarper, Lutfi, Baykan, Fikriye, Ayshe, Servet and Seval… These had been the nurses working with them.
Although the nurses stopped coming, the Turkish Cypriot patients remained in the hospital until 1974…
When the coup happened he had to have a pass to be able to travel since roads were dangerous at that time… His children had measles so his wife Lilly was at home and he had stayed in the hospital until Friday evening until 19.00 on the 19th of July 1974 when he went home to see his family… He would see them and return but on the 20th of July 1974 at 5 o'clock in the morning they would call him from the hospital – those on duty in the hospital had seen Turkish war planes making rounds over the hospital in the morning and had called him to come. Because he had studied in England, Kypros Dimosthenous had a high position in the hospital… At that time they had more than 500 patients… Most of their patients were old and had been staying in the hospital for a long time – they were practically living in the hospital…
"When we wanted to send them home to their villages, some of them refused that since the hospital had become their home – they were living there for many years – there were many people like that…"
Some families did not want their own patients back because they did not want to accept that such an illness had existed in their families and they did not want anyone to know that. So some patients had no place to return to… The hospital was also in a way a place of rehabilitation for them…
So Kypros Dimosthenous went back to the hospital at 5 o'clock on the 20th of July 1974. When he went there, he would see the Turkish war planes coming from the direction of Strovolos-Latsia towards the hospital and flying over the hospital.
He remembers what happened next:
"In the beginning I had told the nurses not to take the patients out of their wards… We wanted to keep them safe in their wards – but before I had given that order, since the doors had been open, some patients had wandered out to the yard of the hospital… The nurses were trying to take them back in… In the beginning the Turkish war planes started firing with machine guns… So they were firing before the bombing started. I saw one of our patients, a big guy being shot due to the gun fire from the planes – he had six or seven bullet wounds on his back… While walking in the yard, he had been shot by the planes and fell down and died… So we gathered all our patients in the wards and locked them in for their own safety. When no one was in the yard, the Turkish war planes started bombing… Ward 35 and ward 4 and 5 were targets of the bombs. These were separate buildings… Ward number 1 was completely destroyed and all our patients who died had been in that ward… More than 30 of our patients had died there… They had thrown a very big bomb in the centre of the ward and this had destroyed the ward. Ward 39 was also a target – this had been a women's ward. When the bombing started what could we do? Nothing… We were only trying to protect ourselves. I was outside in the middle of the yard – there were some bushes and I sat down there – this was around 9 o'clock. When I had gone to the hospital, I had told the nurses I would be at the Ward 35 and had told them "Don't leave the patients to go outside…" As I was sitting there one of our staff had started shouting out in the yard saying "They killed me!" – so I would get up and see what had happened… When Turkish war planes had opened fire, a piece of brick from the wall that was hit had flown and hit his leg and he was bleeding… He had thought he was hit and was shouting. I would take him on my shoulders and bring him to ward 11 which was the farthest for first aid by nurses.
When I went out, the bombing had started and I would sit down behind some bushes… I could not move left or right… I had to stay there for a couple of hours. When things quietened down and I went back to my office, I would see a big hole opened by a bomb that fell where I had been sitting! If I stayed in, I would definitely die… The bombing had stopped around 13.30… As I had told you there were no anti-aircraft guns on the roofs of the wards – they had the shape of the roofs of the houses and were of asbestos… And while building this hospital in 1964, red crosses were painted on these roofs so it would be understood that these were hospital roofs… All of the buildings of the hospital had these red crosses on their roofs. There was not much personnel either – in each ward, there was one or two nurses and they were busy keeping people inside… The Athalassa military camp at the back of the hospital was almost empty because soldiers had been sent here and there…
After the bombing stopped we sat a few hours more and at around 15.00 we went to see the damage done to the hospital. We saw that ward number one was completely destroyed. There was a huge crater in the centre of the ward, created by the bomb.
The hole was as high as a room – they would tell us that this was a big bomb of 500 libres.
We took some patients and some nurses and together, we started collecting the pieces of bodies of our patients who had been torn apart by the bomb. Almost everyone had died in this bombing and their bodies torn to pieces. We could only recognise them from their heads. It was the only way. "This head belongs to this and that head belongs to that person…" So we made a list of the people who died in the bombing. We had our own first aid section to treat the wounded. We carried the wounded patients to wards next to the road. These wards were not damaged. The war planes had bombed the wards at the back, towards the forest. There were seven wards and two blocks of offices next to the road, in the front. We also had a theatre. These were not bombed – the planes had passed over them and bombed the buildings at the back. We carried all the patients to these front wards and treated all those wounded in one ward. The only person who had died in the hospital that had been buried afterwards in Lakatamia was a nurse. We had given his body to his relatives in Lakatamia… All our patients who had died in the bombing, we buried them in the crater of the bomb outside ward number 5. I buried them myself… How did I feel? I felt sad but what could I do? For many years, I was sleeping and I was seeing these in my dreams. We could never imagine that such a thing could happen to our hospital… After this incident, I worked 23 years more in the hospital and retired in 1997. After I retired, I never went back inside this hospital. Because I did not want to remember what we lived through in there, back in 1974… We had buried them without any religious ceremony, without any priest or anything. I was collecting pieces of bodies and putting them in the crater… I would put them in sheets and would put this in the crater… It was as though we were burying animals – it was horrible – it was the summer, the smell was overwhelming, you could not even go near – we would collect, wrap them in sheets and thrown them in the crater… We had an old nurse who passed away a few years ago. He would go to Latsia and find someone with a shiro to come and put some soil over the people we had buried. It was horrible to bury people without a prayer. We had buried Turkish Cypriots, Greek Cypriots, Armenian Cypriots together in that crater, both men and women…"
Kypros's wife, Lilly who had also studied nursing in England and who also worked in the hospital until she retired would have goose bumps when on duty at night and when she had to pass next to this burial site in the yard of the hospital…
"I would feel strange when I would pass near this burial site since I knew that people had been buried there. We told many people many times to do something but no one came and no one showed any interest. I feel very sorry that they had been buried there without any funeral and without any ceremony. My husband had planted trees around it in order to remember them…"
Kypros says, "Our patients were our second family… So many years passed since I retired but if I go to any village and if there is an old patient he would come and hug me and kiss me and would want to sit and drink or eat something. They love us because they too were our family… All our patients were like that with us… Because we loved them… Not like what it is now because now people have changed… In those times we spent more time in the hospital than at home. Just to help patients, I would work at least ten hours instead of seven… But now, I don't know, people are different now…"
I thank Kypros Dimosthenous and Lilly Dimosthenous for giving me the opportunity to put the record straight and to learn what actually happened in the Athalassa Psychiatric Hospital… Let us hope that soon there would be digging and the remains of the 31 patients – three of them Turkish Cypriots – buried in the bomb crater would be exhumed in order to have proper burials and proper graves… May they all rest in peace…

24.6.2017

Photo: With Kypros and Lilly Dimosthenis…

(*) Article published in the POLITIS newspaper on the 9th of July 2017, Sunday. An extended version of this interview was published on my pages entitled "Cyprus: The Untold Stories" in Turkish in the YENİDÜZEN newspaper on 12, 13, 14 and 15 June, 2017 and here are the links:

http://www.yeniduzen.com/kogustaki-hemen-herkes-oldurulmus-ve-bedenleri-parcalanmisti-onlari-ancak-baslarinda-10810yy.htm

http://www.yeniduzen.com/birinci-kogus-yok-edilmisti-buyuk-bir-bombaydi-cunku-birinci-kogusa-atilan-olen-butu-10816yy.htm

http://www.yeniduzen.com/kogusun-tam-ortasinda-cok-buyuk-bir-krater-vardi-3-10821yy.htm

http://www.yeniduzen.com/ceset-parcalarini-toplayip-o-cukura-koyuyordum-parca-parcaydilar-4-10827yy.htm